Newfoundland FolkwaysReblogged from Newfoundland Folkways

newfoundlandfolkways:

Celebrating Caplin

Late spring of each year, residents see caplin (or capelin, to non-Newfoundlanders) rolling onto the shores. Large, dense schools move close to the beaches for spawning (first males, then females), while avoiding the pods of whales migrating down the coast, but are quickly met with people and their nets.

During this season, certain beaches are known to turn silver with the fish as they roll themselves in the waves, right up onto the rocks. They are considered a reliable and important local food source that can be eaten fresh (fried or baked), frozen, or salted and dried for use throughout the year. Freshly pickled fish can be dried lying on a flake, hanging on pins in a board, or hung up like laundry (as seen above). Though less common among younger generations and tourists, the females’ bright orange roe (eggs) can be harvested easily, and is exceptionally delicious directly from the fish, or lightly salted and kept. Further, for some communities the caplin (along with kelp) are traditionally collected and used to enrich soil - as a fertilizer - for homestead gardens.

Similar to smelt, the traditional way to eat the fish is whole as the innards and head become delicious when cooked or dried, and the bones are soft and edible.

The photos in this set were taken in late June, 2014 at Middle Cove beach - a popular location to fill your boots.

Contributed by Lisa Wilson and Justin Oakey

rmwhh:

Mocha Dick is a 52-foot-long recreation of the real-life albino sperm whale that in the nineteenth century terrorized whaling vessels near Mocha Island
in the South Pacific. Mocha Dick, was described in appearance “he was as white as wool”, in an 1839 magazine article from The Knickerbocker, engaged in battle with numerous whaling expeditions, often sinking smaller boats, and was a source of inspiration for Herman Melville’s epic Moby Dick
Mocha Dick,  2009, wool felt, vinyl coated fabric, and internal fan,127 x 165 x 609 inches. in Collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum Phila. PA
Source
High-res

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rmwhh:

Mocha Dick is a 52-foot-long recreation of the real-life albino sperm whale that in the nineteenth century terrorized whaling vessels near Mocha Island

in the South Pacific. Mocha Dick, was described in appearance “he was as white as wool”, in an 1839 magazine article from The Knickerbocker, engaged in battle with numerous whaling expeditions, often sinking smaller boats, and was a source of inspiration for Herman Melville’s epic Moby Dick

Mocha Dick,  2009, wool felt, vinyl coated fabric, and internal fan,127 x 165 x 609 inches. in Collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum Phila. PA

Source

(via hoploid)

Source rmwhh

artbma-pdp:

Blanche Dillaye was the Director of Art Education at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and founding member and first President of the Plastic Club of Philladelphia. Art clubs for men already existed in the city, but women artists had no place to meet, to exchange ideas, or to exhibit their work. The term “Plastic” in the name, suggested by Blanche Dillaye, refers to the state of any unfinished work of art. via
Blanche Dillaye (American, 1851 ‑ 1931)
On Little Egg Harbor Bay, 1883
Etching
The Baltimore Museum of Art: Garrett Collection, BMA 1946.112.12200

PDP @artBMAReblogged from PDP @artBMA

artbma-pdp:

Blanche Dillaye was the Director of Art Education at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and founding member and first President of the Plastic Club of Philladelphia. Art clubs for men already existed in the city, but women artists had no place to meet, to exchange ideas, or to exhibit their work. The term “Plastic” in the name, suggested by Blanche Dillaye, refers to the state of any unfinished work of art. via

Blanche Dillaye (American, 1851 ‑ 1931)

On Little Egg Harbor Bay, 1883

Etching

The Baltimore Museum of Art: Garrett Collection, BMA 1946.112.12200